The Roman Society

Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies

Council Members

Elected June 2019

Siobhan Chomse is Lecturer in Latin Language and Literature at Royal Holloway, University of London. She completed her PhD in 2015 at the University of Cambridge, where she taught for two years before joining the Department of Classics at Royal Holloway in September 2017. Siobhan’s research focuses particularly on the idea of the sublime and its role in the literature of early imperial Rome. Her work has explored expressions of sublimity found in architecture, technology and the natural world, from monuments to ruins, siege engines to earthquakes. At present, she is completing revisions to her doctoral thesis (on the sublime in Virgil, Lucan and Tacitus) for publication and will shortly begin work on a new project on perceptions and representations of the emperor as a sublime being.

Ian Goh is a Lecturer in Classics at Swansea University. He is Australian; after his undergraduate degree at Harvard and MPhil and PhD at Cambridge, he worked at KCL, the University of Manchester, Birkbeck, University of London, and the University of Exeter before moving to Wales in 2017. His research has focused on Roman verse satire, particularly the genre’s founder Gaius Lucilius, and Latin literature, especially Republican and triumviral texts, as well as ancient literary and cultural history more broadly. He is writing a monograph about the Scipionic branch of the gens Cornelia, and planning a future book about ancient vomit.

Dr Mairéad McAuley is a Lecturer in Classics at University College London. Her research focuses on early imperial Latin literature, from the Augustan to Flavian periods,  which she combines with a broader interest in gender, literary theory and the Classical tradition. Her first monograph is a study of motherhood in Roman literature, entitled Reproducing Rome: Motherhood in Virgil, Ovid, Seneca and Statius (Oxford 2016).  Prior to joining UCL, she has held a Junior Research Fellowship at King's College Cambridge, alongside postdoctoral research fellowships in South Africa (at UKZN and the University of Johannesburg). She subsequently took a career break to raise a family and returned to academia in 2017.   She is currently working on a study of the significance of hands and touch in Roman literature and culture.

Dr Donncha O'Rourke is Lecturer in Classics at the University of Edinburgh.  He holds degrees in Classics from Trinity College, Dublin, and came across the water in 2010 to take up a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. His research focusses primarily on Augustan poetry, especially elegy, and didactic poetry, especially Lucretius.

Dr Bobby Xinyue is a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow in Latin Literature and Renaissance Studies at the University of Warwick. He completed his doctoral degree at UCL, held a lectureship in Classics and Ancient History at the University of Exeter from 2014 to 2015, and between 2015 and 2017 he was a Teaching Fellow in Latin Literature at the University of Warwick. He is currently one of the editors for the Bloomsbury Neo-Latin Series. His research interests include Augustan poetry and Roman political thought, humanist Latin literature, Renaissance reception of Ovid, and the reception of Graeco-Roman antiquity in modern China.

 

Elected June 2020

Dr Henriette van der Blom is Senior Lecturer in Ancient History at the University of Birmingham [www.birmingham.ac.uk/henriettevanderblom]. Her research focuses on the political life and oratorical culture of the Roman republic and early Empire, especially the history of the late Roman republic, patterns of political careers, all aspects of Cicero, oratory and rhetoric, exempla and cultural memory. She has published Cicero's Role Models (OUP 2010), Oratory and Political Career in the late Roman Republic (CUP 2016), several edited volumes on oratory and politics and on historical consciousness, and a string of articles/chapters on the reception of republican oratory in the early imperial period. As the founding director of Network for Oratory and Politics [www.birmingham.ac.uk/nop], she led an interdisciplinary, impact-heavy research project into the Crisis of Rhetoric [www.birmingham.ac.uk/cor] in modern British political speech. She is the co-editor (with Harvey Yunis) of the first volume of the forthcoming Cambridge History of Rhetoric, which focuses on the ancient world from the third millennium BC to AD 350, and she is a co-editor (with Catherine Steel, Christa Gray and Richard Marshall) of the forthcoming Fragments of the Roman Republican Orators.

Professor Will Bowden is Associate Professor in Roman Archaeology at the University of Nottingham. His research focuses on urbanism and identity in the Roman and late antique periods. He has been involved in major fieldwork projects in Balkans and the UK, most recently at Venta Icenorum in Norfolk. Major publications include Epirus Vetus: the Archaeology of a Late Antique Province (2003) and Butrint 3: Excavations at the Triconch Palace (2011, with R. Hodges). He is also involved in heritage interpretation projects utilising Virtual Reality and serves as trustee for two community archaeology charities.  

Dr Penny Goodman is Senior Lecturer in Roman History at the University of Leeds, where she has worked since 2006. Her Oxford DPhil thesis was published in 2007 as The Roman City and Its Periphery: From Rome to Gaul, and she has continued working on the spatial dimensions of Roman urbanism ever since. A second research strand on receptions of the emperor Augustus is represented by her 2018 volume, Afterlives of Augustus, AD 14-2014.

Julia Hillner is a Professor of Ancient History at the Bonn Center for Dependency and Slavery Studies. Before moving to Bonn she taught at the University of Manchester and, most recently, as Professor of Medieval History at the University of Sheffield, specialising in late antiquity. Her research interests include the Roman family and the household, gender, crime and punishment and the city of Rome. Her books include Prison, Punishment and Penance in Late Antiquity (CUP 2015). Her latest book is Helena Augusta: Mother of the Empire, which is due to appear with Oxford University Press in 2022.

Prof Christian Laes, professor of ancient history at the University of Manchester, studies  the social and cultural history of Roman and Late Antiquity, paying particular attention to the human life course: childhood, youth, family, sexuality, and disabilities. His monographs and over hundred contributions have been published with internationally renowned publishers and journals. Next to this, he focuses on epigraphy (with an edition of the inscriptions from Grumentum forthcoming), Neo-Latin authors and didactics of Latin and Ancient Greek. He has been part of several international research networks, and is the editor of three Bloomsbury volumes: 'The Cultural History of Disability/ Education/ Youth.'

 

Elected June 2021

Dr Caroline Barron is Assistant Professor in Classics (Roman History) at Durham University. She is an ancient historian with a particular research interest in Latin epigraphy and its reception, from antiquity to the present day. Caroline completed her PhD at King’s College London in 2015, after which she was a Teaching Fellow at KCL. Following this she worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the Centre national de la recherche scientifique in Aix-Marseille Université, on the ERC-funded 'Judaism and Rome' project, and held a Rome Award at the British School at Rome 2018. Before joining Durham's Department of Classics and Ancient History Caroline was a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow at Birkbeck where she worked on epigraphic forgeries and the 18th century art market. She is a co-editor on the second digital edition of Inscriptions of Roman Tripolitania and on the editorial team for the second edition of Roman Statutes.

Caroline Bristow is the Director of the Cambridge School Classics Project, part of the University of Cambridge’s Faculty of Education and most well known for the creation of the Cambridge Latin Course. In addition to the core work of running CSCP she has a research interest in the pedagogy of social justice, with a focus on the effective, inclusive and trauma informed teaching of narratives involving sexual violence.

Previous to this role she was the Classics and Religious Studies Subject Specialist at the exam board OCR where she led on qualification reform, including working with the Department for Education and Ofqual to develop subject specific guidelines and regulations. 

After graduating from the University of Oxford with a BA in Ancient and Modern History and an MSt in Ancient History Caroline taught a variety of subjects in the UK state sector including Classical Civilisation, Classical Greek, Religious Studies, Philosophy and Anthropology. Each summer she teaches on one of the JSST Summer Schools to get a small 'fix' of classroom time and she is the Non-Executive Director for Education of Innovating Minds, a company working to improve access to clinical mental health support in schools.

Dr Shushma Malik is Senior Lecturer in Classics (Roman History) at the University of Roehampton. Shushma completed her PhD at the University of Bristol in 2013. Before joining Roehampton, she worked at the University of Manchester (2013-2015) and the University of Queensland in Brisbane (2015-17). Her research interests include Roman emperors and their reception, imperial historiography, and political culture. In particular, she has worked extensively on the Emperor Nero’s portrayal in Christian history as the Antichrist, and has written on portrayals of Roman emperors in the literature and letters of Oscar Wilde. Her monograph The Nero-Antichrist: Founding and Fashioning a Paradigm was published in 2020 by Cambridge University Press. She is currently Co-I on an AHRC-DFG funded project at the Universities of Roehampton and Potsdam, “Twisted Transfers”: Discursive Construction of Corruption in Ancient Greece and Rome (2020-23).

Dr Mai Musié is a part-time freelance community engagement practitioner and facilitator and a part-time Public Engagement Manager at the Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford. She manages a diverse public engagement programme with the Bodleian's collections through exhibitions, special events, and workshops – all designed with schools and communities at the heart of the engagement process. Mai has been a key voice in the UK for engagement with the humanities, and is the co-founder of the Classics in Communities partnership project between the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, and The Iris Project (an educational Classics charity). The project aims to promote and encourage the teaching of Latin and Ancient Greek at primary and early secondary school level (and beyond) in UK state schools. Mai has had multiple speaking engagements, written blogs and featured in podcasts on public engagement with the Classics, decoloniality and restitution of art. 

Her research areas tend to focus on race and ethnicity in the ancient world but has a passing interest in medieval manuscripts, particularly from Ethiopian and Eritrean tradition. Mai is the co-editor (with Dr Arlene Holmes-Henderson and Steve Hunt) of the book Forward with Classics: Classical Languages in Schools and Communities , which investigates the motivations of teachers and learners behind the rise of Classics in the classroom and in communities. It also explores the ways in which knowledge pf classical languages is considered valuable for diverse learners in the 21st century. 

Dr Harriet O’Neill is Assistant Director for the Fine Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences at the British School at Rome. She undertook her BA in Modern History at the University of Oxford and holds MAs in History of Art (UCL) and Art Museum and Gallery Studies (Newcastle). For her PhD entitled ‘Reframing the Italian Renaissance at the National Gallery’ she was based at UCL and the National Gallery, London. She has held curatorial positions at the National Gallery and Royal Holloway, University of London and previously worked as specialist in frames and nineteenth- and twentieth-century art at Christie’s and Bonhams auctioneers. She is an Honorary Research Associate of the School of Modern Languages at Royal Holloway and a Trustee for the Sussex Archaeological Society.

Dr Jamie Wood is Associate Lecturer in History at the University of Lincoln, where he teaches modules on late antiquity and the early medieval period. He joined Lincoln in 2013, having taught previously at Manchester, Sheffield, Warwick and Liverpool in Classics, Ancient History, History and Religions and Theology. He works on the social, cultural and religious history of late antique Spain and Portugal and has published extensively on the writings of Isidore of Seville and the emergence of the episcopacy in post-Roman Hispania. He is currently Co-I on an AHRC-funded project on the cult of the saints in late antique and early medieval Iberia. 

Siobhan Chomse
Siobhan Chomse

Ian Goh
Ian Goh

Mairéad McAuley
Mairéad McAuley

Bobby Xinyue
Bobby Xinyue

Henriette van der Blom

Henriette van der Blom

Will Bowden

Will Bowden

Penny Goodman

Penny Goodman

Julia Hillner

Julia Hillner

Christian Laes

Christian Laes

Caroline Bristow

Caroline Bristow

Shushma Malik

Mai Musié

Mai Musié

Harriet O’Neill

Harriet O’Neill

Jamie Wood

Jamie Wood

The Roman Society
Senate House
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HU

Telephone: 020 7862 8727

Email: office@romansociety.org

The Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies (The Roman Society) is a registered charity in the UK.

Charity Registration Number: 210644
Company Registration Number: 114442