The Roman Society

Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies

Council Members

Elected June 2018

Dr Simon Corcoran is Lecturer in Ancient History at Newcastle University. Having completed his doctorate on the era of the tetrarchs and Constantine, his current principal area of interest is Roman legal history across both antiquity and the early Middle Ages, on which he has published widely in print and on-line, especially as part of work for the Volterra Roman law projects [https://www.ucl.ac.uk/volterra] based at University College London. He also has strong interests in palaeography and the manuscript transmission of ancient texts, as well as Greek and Latin epigraphy.

Dr James Corke-Webster is a Lecturer in Roman History at King's College, London. Previously, he studied Classics and Theology as Oxford, Cambridge, and Manchester, was a Fulbright Scholar at Berkeley in California, and held lectureships at Edinburgh and Durham. He has particular interests in early Christian and late antique history and literature. His first book, Eusebius and Empire, investigates the first narrative history of early Christianity, the fourth century Ecclesiastical History.

Prof. Serafina Cuomo has worked at Imperial College, Birkbeck and Durham. Her research focusses on the social and cultural history of Greek and Roman science and technology. She has published on mathematics, land-surveying, catapults and military technology, and is currently writing a book on numeracy, and editing and translating an anthology of Greek and Roman STM sources for Penguin Classics. She is Area Editor for the Oxford Classical Dictionary.

Dr Sophie Hay FSA is a Post-doctoral Research Associate in the Faculty of Classics, Cambridge University. Her current research focuses on the publication of the British School at Rome and University of Reading’s joint Pompeii Project. The research for her doctoral thesis was born out of this project and aimed to understand the chronological development of a group of non-elite houses in Pompeii by studying the standing structures. Between 2003 and 2017, she worked for the University of Southampton as an archaeological geophysicist and was based in Italy collaborating with the British School at Rome. She has project managed and conducted over 100 geophysical surveys throughout Italy as well as further afield in Sudan, Libya, Turkey and Tunisia.

Professor Helen Lovatt is Professor of Classics at the University of Nottingham, where she has taught since 2003. She studied at Pembroke College, Cambridge, where she wrote a PhD on the Latin epic poet Statius. She now works on Greek and Latin literature and its reception, and is currently writing a cultural history of the Argonaut myth. She has published books on Classics and Children’s Literature (edited with Owen Hodkinson, I.B. Tauris 2018), The Epic Gaze (Cambridge University Press, 2013) and Statius and Epic Games (Cambridge University Press, 2005).

Dr Ross I. Thomas is a curator within the Dept of Greece and Rome, The British Museum, with responsibility for the Roman collections. He specialises on the Hellenistic and Roman Eastern Mediterranean, and Red Sea regions, with a particular focus on maritime archaeology and port communities. He has undertaken fieldwork on land or underwater in Britain, Egypt, Italy, Jordan, Sudan and UAE, most recently directing or coordinating four BM fieldwork projects. Current projects include the port site of Naukratis in the Egyptian Delta, and in the ‘Pantanello’ at Hadrian’s Villa in Tivoli. He is keen that such research reaches both academic and general audiences through publication, presentation, exhibition, display and other media.

 

Elected June 2019

Siobhan Chomse is Lecturer in Latin Language and Literature at Royal Holloway, University of London. She completed her PhD in 2015 at the University of Cambridge, where she taught for two years before joining the Department of Classics at Royal Holloway in September 2017. Siobhan’s research focuses particularly on the idea of the sublime and its role in the literature of early imperial Rome. Her work has explored expressions of sublimity found in architecture, technology and the natural world, from monuments to ruins, siege engines to earthquakes. At present, she is completing revisions to her doctoral thesis (on the sublime in Virgil, Lucan and Tacitus) for publication and will shortly begin work on a new project on perceptions and representations of the emperor as a sublime being.

Dr Mairéad McAuley is a Lecturer in Classics at University College London. Her research focuses on early imperial Latin literature, from the Augustan to Flavian periods,  which she combines with a broader interest in gender, literary theory and the Classical tradition. Her first monograph is a study of motherhood in Roman literature, entitled Reproducing Rome: Motherhood in Virgil, Ovid, Seneca and Statius (Oxford 2016).  Prior to joining UCL, she has held a Junior Research Fellowship at King's College Cambridge, alongside postdoctoral research fellowships in South Africa (at UKZN and the University of Johannesburg). She subsequently took a career break to raise a family and returned to academia in 2017.   She is currently working on a study of the significance of hands and touch in Roman literature and culture.

Dr Donncha O'Rourke is Lecturer in Classics at the University of Edinburgh.  He holds degrees in Classics from Trinity College, Dublin, and came across the water in 2010 to take up a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. His research focusses primarily on Augustan poetry, especially elegy, and didactic poetry, especially Lucretius.

Dr Bobby Xinyue is a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow in Latin Literature and Renaissance Studies at the University of Warwick. He completed his doctoral degree at UCL, held a lectureship in Classics and Ancient History at the University of Exeter from 2014 to 2015, and between 2015 and 2017 he was a Teaching Fellow in Latin Literature at the University of Warwick. He is currently one of the editors for the Bloomsbury Neo-Latin Series. His research interests include Augustan poetry and Roman political thought, humanist Latin literature, Renaissance reception of Ovid, and the reception of Graeco-Roman antiquity in modern China.

 

Elected June 2020

Dr Henriette van der Blom is Senior Lecturer in Ancient History at the University of Birmingham [www.birmingham.ac.uk/henriettevanderblom]. Her research focuses on the political life and oratorical culture of the Roman republic and early Empire, especially the history of the late Roman republic, patterns of political careers, all aspects of Cicero, oratory and rhetoric, exempla and cultural memory. She has published Cicero's Role Models (OUP 2010), Oratory and Political Career in the late Roman Republic (CUP 2016), several edited volumes on oratory and politics and on historical consciousness, and a string of articles/chapters on the reception of republican oratory in the early imperial period. As the founding director of Network for Oratory and Politics [www.birmingham.ac.uk/nop], she led an interdisciplinary, impact-heavy research project into the Crisis of Rhetoric [www.birmingham.ac.uk/cor] in modern British political speech. She is the co-editor (with Harvey Yunis) of the first volume of the forthcoming Cambridge History of Rhetoric, which focuses on the ancient world from the third millennium BC to AD 350, and she is a co-editor (with Catherine Steel, Christa Gray and Richard Marshall) of the forthcoming Fragments of the Roman Republican Orators.

Professor Will Bowden is Associate Professor in Roman Archaeology at the University of Nottingham. His research focuses on urbanism and identity in the Roman and late antique periods. He has been involved in major fieldwork projects in Balkans and the UK, most recently at Venta Icenorum in Norfolk. Major publications include Epirus Vetus: the Archaeology of a Late Antique Province (2003) and Butrint 3: Excavations at the Triconch Palace (2011, with R. Hodges). He is also involved in heritage interpretation projects utilising Virtual Reality and serves as trustee for two community archaeology charities.  

Dr Penny Goodman is Senior Lecturer in Roman History at the University of Leeds, where she has worked since 2006. Her Oxford DPhil thesis was published in 2007 as The Roman City and Its Periphery: From Rome to Gaul, and she has continued working on the spatial dimensions of Roman urbanism ever since. A second research strand on receptions of the emperor Augustus is represented by her 2018 volume, Afterlives of Augustus, AD 14-2014.

Julia Hillner is a Professor of Medieval History at the University of Sheffield, working on late antiquity. She holds a PhD in Ancient History from the University of Bonn and, before moving to Sheffield in 2008, was a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow in Classics and Ancient History at the University of Manchester. Her research interests include the family and the household, crime and punishment and the city of Rome in late antiquity. Her latest book is Prison, Punishment and Penance in Late Antiquity (CUP 2015) and she is currently working on a biography of Helena, mother of Constantine the Great.

Prof Christian Laes, professor of ancient history at the University of Manchester, studies  the social and cultural history of Roman and Late Antiquity, paying particular attention to the human life course: childhood, youth, family, sexuality, and disabilities. His monographs and over hundred contributions have been published with internationally renowned publishers and journals. Next to this, he focuses on epigraphy (with an edition of the inscriptions from Grumentum forthcoming), Neo-Latin authors and didactics of Latin and Ancient Greek. He has been part of several international research networks, and is the editor of three Bloomsbury volumes: 'The Cultural History of Disability/ Education/ Youth.'

Simon Corcoran

James Corke-Webster
 

Serafina Cuomo

Sophie Hay

Helen Lovatt

Ross Thomas

Siobhan Chomse
Siobhan Chomse

Mairéad McAuley
Mairéad McAuley

Bobby Xinyue
Bobby Xinyue

Henriette van der Blom

Henriette van der Blom

Will Bowden

Will Bowden

Penny Goodman

Penny Goodman

Julia Hillner

Julia Hillner

Christian Laes

Christian Laes

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